L

Lesion:

a change in body tissue; sometimes used as a synonym for tumor.

Leukemia:

cancer of the blood-forming tissues. Categorized as acute or chronic.

Lymph nodes or glands:

small, bean-shaped structures located along the channels of the lymphatic system. These nodes can contain bacteria or cancer cells.

Lymphoma:

a form of cancer that affects the lymph system, which is categorized as Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s varieties.

I

Informed consent:

the process by which sufficient information is provided by the healthcare team in understandable language about proposed treatment in order for the patient to make decisions about treatment and care.

IV:

intravenous. This means an injection of a solution into a vein such as intravenous fluids.

H

Hematologist:

a physician who specializes in treating blood disorders, such as leukemia and anemias.

Hormone therapy:

treatment of cancer by removing, blocking, or adding hormones. Hormones are chemicals produced by glands, which control how certain cells or organs act.

Hyperalimentation:

nourishing the body through the veins or a tube into the stomach with high calorie fluids; also called total parenteral nutrition (TPN).

G

Growth factor:

a hormone-like substance (medication) that stimulates the bone marrow to produce blood cells; also called colony-stimulating factor (CSF).

E

Edema:

swelling of the body tissues with fluid.

Emesis:

vomiting with or without nausea.

C

Cancer:

a general term for a large group of diseases (more than 100), all characterized by uncontrolled growth, invasion, and spread of abnormal cells to other parts of the body.

Carcinogen:

any substance that initiates or promotes the development of cancer. For example, asbestos is a carcinogen.

Carcinoma:

a form of cancer that develops in tissues covering the lining organs of the body, such as the skin, the uterus, the lung, or the breast. Adenocarcinoma affects glandular tissue. Squamous cell carcinoma affects epithethial tissue.

B

Benign:

an abnormal growth of tumor, which is not cancer and does not spread to other areas of the body.

Biologic response modifiers:

a new class of compounds, such as interferon, produced in the body that fight cancer naturally by stimulating the body’s own immune system; also called "immunotherapy."

Biopsy:

the surgical removal of a small piece of tissue for microscopic examination to determine if cancer cells are present.

Bone marrow:

the soft, fatty substance that fills the cavities of bones where blood cells are made.

A

Analgesia:

a medication for pain relief.

Alopecia:

loss of hair.

Anemia:

a low red blood cell count, which can result in fatigue and sometimes dizziness or shortness of breath.

Anorexia:

loss of appetite.

Indigent Drug Program United States Senate

Provides a list of drug companies and drugs that are provided free of cost under the indigent patient drug program.

“I Can Cope” Online Classes Through the American Cancer Society 

“I Can Cope” online classes are available through the ACS www.cancer.org/onlineclasses.  These classes are self-paced and can be done in the privacy of one's home.  They provide valuable information to assist in the cancer journey. 

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